Reference List

When it comes to information, there’s a lot of sh*t out there. We’re here to challenge misinformation and to filter through the noise. At Ferly, it’s in our DNA to question the natural order of things. "Because it's always been that way" just doesn't fly with us. Below is a ‘working list’ of all the research underpinning our current content.

 
Stripes2.png
 
  • Allen, L. (2004). Beyond the birds and the bees: constituting a discover of erotics in sexuality education. Gender and Education, 16(2), 151-167.

  • American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) (2016). Plastic surgery statistics report. Arlington: ASPS and Data Harbor Solutions.

  • Atkins, L., West, R., & Michie, S. (2014). The behaviour change wheel: a guide to designing interventions. London: Silverback Publishing.

  • Bay-Cheng, L.Y., & Bruns, A.E. (2016). Yes, but: young women’s views of unwanted sex at the intersection of gender and class. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 40(4), 504-517.

  • Boutot, M. (2018). How many types of orgasm are there, really? Researching female orgasm [web article]. Retrieved from https://helloclue.com/articles/sex/researching-orgasm-how-many-types-of-female-orgasms-are-there-really

  • Brinthaupt, T.M., Hein, M.B., & Kramer, T.E. (2009). The self-talk scale: development, factor analysis, and validation. Journal of Personality Assessment, 91(1), 82-92.

  • Chalker, R. (2018). The clitoral truth: about pleasure, orgasm, female ejaculation, the G-spot, and masturbation (2nd ed.). New York: Seven Stories Press.

  • Colson, M.D. (2010). Female orgasm: Myths, facts and controversies. Sexologies, 19(1), 8-14.

  • Costa, R.M., & Brody, S. (2011). Greater resting heart rate variability is associated with orgasms through penile–vaginal intercourse, but not with orgasms from other sources. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 9(1), 188–197.

  • Cully, J.A., & Teten, A.L. (2008). A therapist’s guide to brief cognitive behavioural therapy. Houston: Department of Veterans Affairs Couth Central MIRECC.

  • Cuntim, M., & Nobre, P.J. (2011). The role of cognitive distraction on female orgasm. Sexologies, 20(4), 212-214.

  • Tefler, N., & McWeeney, C. (2018). What is the clitoris? [web article]. Retrieved from https://helloclue.com/articles/cycle-a-z/what-is-the-clitoris

  • Moser, J.S., Dougherty, A., Mattson, W.I., Katz, B., Morran, T.P., Guevarra, D.,…Kross., E. (2017). Third-person self-talk facilitates emotion regulation without engaging cognitive control: converging evidence from ERP and fMRI. Nature: Scientific Reports, 7(4519), 1-9.

  • Emhardt, E., Siegel, J., & Hoffman, L. (2016). Anatomic variation and orgasm: could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success?. Clinical Anatomy, 29(5), 665–672.

  • Foldes, P., & Buisson, O. (2009). The clitoral complex: a dynamic sonographic study. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 6(5), 1223-1231.

  • Frederick, D., John, H., Garcia, J., & Lloyd, E. (2018). Differences in orgasm frequency among gay, lesbian, bisexual and heterosexual men and women in a U.S. national sample. Archives of Sexual Behaviour, 47(1), 273-288. Sumter, S.R., Vandenbosch, L., & Ligtenberg, L. (2017). Love me Tinder: untangling emerging adults’ motivations for using the dating application Tinder. Telematics and Informatics, 34(2017), p. 67-78.

  • Grossman, I., & E. Kross. (2014). Exploring Solomon’s paradox: self-distancing eliminates the self-other asymmetry in wise reasoning about close relationships in younger and older adults. Psychological Science, 25(8), 1571-1580.

  • Guo, Y.N., Ng, E.M.L., & K. Chan (2004). Foreplay, orgasm and after-play among Shanghai couples and its integrative relation with their marital satisfaction. Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 19(1), 65-78.

  • Hancock, J., & Barker, M.J. (2017). Enjoy sex (how, when and if you want to): a practical and inclusive guide. London: Icon Books. Kross, E., & Ayduk, O. (2017). Self-distancing: theory, research and current directions. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 55(2), 81-136.

  • Herbenick, D., & Fortenberry, J.D. (2011). Exercise-induced orgasm and pleasure among women. Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 26(4), 373-388.

  • Herbenick, D., Fu, T.S., Arter, J., Sanders, S.A. & Dodge, B. (2018). Women's experiences with genital touching, sexual pleasure, and orgasm: results from a U.S. probability sample of women ages 18-94. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 44(2), 201-212.

  • Jannini, E.A., Buisson O., & Rubio-Casillas, A. (2014). Beyond the G-spot: clitourethrovaginal complex anatomy in female orgasm. Nature Reviews Urology, 11(9), 531-538.

  • Jannini, E.A., Rubio‐Casillas, A., Whipple, B., Buisson, O., Komisaruk, B.R., & Brody, S. (2012). Female orgasm(s): one, two, several. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 9(4), 956–965.

  • Katz, J., & Tirone, V. (2009). Women’s sexual compliance with male dating partners: associations with investment in ideal womanhood and romantic well-being. Sex Roles, 60(2009), 347-356.

  • Koedt, A. (1970). The myth of the vaginal orgasm. Sommerville: New England Press.

  • Komisaruk, B.R., Bever-Flores, C., & Whipple, B. (2007) The science of orgasm. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

  • Komisaruk, B.R., Whipple, B., Nasserzadeh, S. & Bever-Flores, C. (2010). The orgasm answer guide. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

  • Kringelbach, M.L., & Berridge, K.C. (2010). The neuroscience of happiness and pleasure. Sociological Research Online, 77(2), 659-678.

  • Levin, R.J. (2014). The pharmacology of the human female orgasm - its biological and physiological backgrounds. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 121(2014), 62-70.

  • Levin, R.J., Both, S., Georgiadis, J., Kukkonen, T., Park, K., & Yang, C.C. (2016) The physiology of female sexual function and the pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 13(5), 733-759.

  • Nagoski, E. (2015). Come as you are: the surprising new science that will transform your sex life. New York: Simon & Schuster.

  • National Health Service (2018). Sexual health: keeping your vagina clean and healthy [web article]. Retrieved from https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/keeping-your-vagina-clean-and-healthy/

  • Nobre, P.J., Pinto-Gouveia, J. (2003). Sexual modes questionnaire: measure to assess the interaction between cognitions, emotions and sexual response. The Journal of Sex Research, 40(4), 368–382.Hines, T.M. (2001). The G-spot: A modern gynecologic myth. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 185(2), 359-362.

  • Oakley, S.H., Mutema, G.K., Crisp, C.C., Estanol, M.V., Kleeman, S.D., Fellner, A.N., & Pauls, R.N. (2013). Innervation and histology of the clitoral-urethal complex: a cross-sectional cadaver study. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10(9), 2211-2218.

  • O'Connell, H.E., Sanjeevan, K.V., & Hutson J.M. (2005). Anatomy of the clitoris. The Journal of Urology, 174(4), 1189-1195.

  • Pauls, R.N. (2015) Anatomy of the clitoris and the female sexual response. Clinical Anatomy, 28(3), 376-384.

  • Pfaus, J.G., Quintana, G.R., Mac Cionnaith, C., & Parada, M. (2016). The whole versus the sum of some of the parts: toward resolving the apparent controversy of clitoral versus vaginal orgasms. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology, 25 (6), 325-378.

  • Puppo, V. (2011). Embryology and anatomy of the vulva: the female orgasm and sexual health. The European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 154(2011), 3-8.

  • Puppo, V. (2013). Anatomy and physiology of the clitoris, vestibular bulbs, and labia minora with a review of the female orgasm and the prevention of female sexual dysfunction. Clinical Anatomy, 26(1), 134-152.

  • Puppo, V., & Puppo, G. (2014). Anatomy of sex: Revision of the new anatomical terms used for the clitoris and the female orgasm by sexologists. Clinical Anatomy, 28(3), 293-304.Ekberg Stiritz, S. (2008). Cultural cliteracy: Exposing the contexts of women’s not coming. Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice, 23(2), 243 - 266.

  • Quinn-Nilas, C., & Kennett, D.J. (2018). Reasons why undergraduate women comply with unwanted, non-coercive sexual advances: a serial indirect effect model integrating sexual script theory and sexual self-control perspectives. The Journal of Social Psychology, 158(5), 603-615.

  • Sharp, G., Mattiske, J., & Vale, K.I. (2016). Motivations, expectations, and experiences of labiaplasty: a qualitative study. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 36(8), 920-928.

  • Sharp, G., Tiggemann, M., & Mattiske, J. (2016). Factors that influence the decision to undergo labiaplasty: media, relationships, and psychological well-being. Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 36(4), 469-478.

  • Tavares, I.M., Laan, E.T.M., & Nobre, P.J. (2017). Cognitive-affective dimensions of female orgasm: the role of automatic thoughts and affect during sexual activity. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 14(6), 818-828.

  • The Eve Appeal (2016). Why ‘vagina’ should be part of every young woman’s vocabulary [web article]. Retrieved from https://eveappeal.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/The-Eve-Appeal-Vagina-Dialogues.pdf

  • Walker, S.J. (1997). When “no” becomes “yes”: why girls and women consent to unwanted sex. Applies & Preventive Psychology, 6(1997), 157-166.

  • Whipple, B., & Komisaruk, B.R. (1985). Elevation of pain threshold by vaginal stimulation in women. Pain, 21(4), 357-367.